Krishna Temple complex

Krishna Temple complex

BRIEF HISTORY:The Krishna temple has an inscription of Krishnadeva Raya, dated A.D. 1513, recording that an image of Bala Krishna which he had brought from a temple in Udayagiri was enshrined in a mantapa in this temple. This large and ornate east-facing temple complex is built in the typical Vijayanagara style.

A large open prakara with high walls contain Swami and Amman sanctums and many sub-shrines. The main sanctum group contains the usual typical arrangement of an open mahamantapa, a sabhamantapa and a covered pradakshinapatha running round the garbhagriha and antarala. One of the pillars in the ardhamantapa is noteworthy, as all ten avataras of Vishnu including the rare form of Kalki are carved on it. Kalki is depicted as a seated figure with a horse’s head. The garbhagriha and antarala have an ornate and well-finished exterior with fine basĀ¬reliefs. The sanctum is a three-storeyed vimana with a circular sikhara much dilapidated. The Amman shrine is to the north-west of the Swami sanctum and has salasikharas. The Krishna temple is interesting for the numerous sub-shrines it contains. One of these in the south has many stucco figures of Subrahmanya seated on peacock. The presence of a Subrahmanya shrine in a Krishna temple is rather unique.

The three gopuras of the temple to the east, south and north, are much dilapidated. Between the two prakaras towards the south is a huge dome roofed granary built on a slopy rock bed. It is a huge hall, rectangular on plan and has six bays. Externally austere, it has a staircase heading to the roof, comprising of six domes, all forming an opening in the centre probably used for filling the granary. At a short distance from the main entrance towards the east along the outer prakara a series of flights of steps lead to the huge 500 m long car street (Krishna Bazaar) flanked by rows of mantapas. Behind the northern row of bazaar mantapas at a distance of 200 m from the temple is the usual tank, Lokapavani, surrounded by a colonnade with entrance from the west. The interior veneered with a flight of steps accommodates a four-pillared pavilion at the centre used for keeping the Utsava-murti, having brick and lime superstructure.